Birmingham LGBT History Festival: The Killing of Sister George, plus Q&A 18

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A free screening, discussion and Q&A of the iconic and controversial film ‘The Killing of Sister George’.

The film follows the turbulent relationship that takes place between lovers June Buckridge (Beryl Reid) and Childie (Susannah York), and earned an X rating in the US and faced censorship challenges in Britain for its explicit portrayal of lesbian sexuality.It is full of negative stereotypes and sensationalized drama, but it also offers a glimpse into the real-life world of lesbian social life in 1960s Britain, including a scene shot in the famous Gateways Club. Our panel discussion and Q&A lead by Dr. Mo. Moulton (University of Birmingham) will place the film in its historical context and talk about the importance of bars to lesbian culture, then and now.

Dr. Mo Moulton is lecturer in the history of race and empire at the University of Birmingham. In addition to her work on decolonization, she has published in “British Queer History” an essay on the queer life of Anglo-Irish builder and writer Katherine Everett. She also teaches on subcultures and sexual and ethnic minorities in modern Britain.

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